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Inside Housing – News – London housing associations face shortfall of 10,000 asset management workers a year

Inside Housing – News – London housing associations face shortfall of 10,000 asset management workers a year

Elsewhere, short-term procurement contracts hamper contractors’ ability to invest in long-term training and skills, while the quality of apprenticeship programmes in social housing is “inconsistent” and training programmes are “limited in scope”.

Inside the Housing has made the sector’s recruitment challenge the focus of its Housing Hires campaign. The campaign aims to promote the sector as a place to work and share best practice on how to recruit and retain social housing staff.

Housing associations currently build a quarter of London’s new homes. However, Fiona Fletcher-Smith, chief executive of L&Q, said: “Our workforce is ageing, retiring and not being replaced by newly trained staff. This growing challenge threatens the supply of genuinely affordable, warm and safe housing in the capital.”

Elly Hoult, Peabody’s chief operating officer and executive vice president, said: “There is no ‘quick fix’ to this problem. It takes a long-term plan, with organizations across the industry working together to bring about meaningful change.

“This is an important first step and we welcome more organisations to join the London Homes Coalition. Together, we are finding ways to get more people from all backgrounds into construction jobs, while also addressing the skills gap that is increasingly becoming a barrier as we look to build more homes and renovate many more.”

Currently, women make up just 14% of the construction workforce in London, with around 2% in trades occupations. Meanwhile, ethnic minorities make up 24% of the capital’s construction workforce.

In June, Ms Fletcher-Smith told the Housing 2024 conference in Manchester that a shortage of engineers and scaffolders was holding back housing associations’ fire safety recovery efforts.

She said: “Even if I had all the money I needed, I simply couldn’t get the right number of fire engineers or – the biggest labour shortage in London – scaffolding. And if you’re dealing with towers over 60 feet, you need scaffolding.”